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SEC Filings

20-F
TRIVAGO N.V. filed this Form 20-F on 03/06/2018
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not be able to obtain or continue to obtain licenses and technologies from these third parties at all or on reasonable terms. Also to the extent that third parties are obligated to indemnify us for breaches of our intellectual property rights, these third parties may be unable to meet these obligations. Any of these events may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
We have registered domain names for websites that we use in our business, such as www.trivago.com, www.trivago.de and www.trivago.co.uk. If we lose the ability to use a domain name, we would be forced to incur significant expenses to market our services under a new domain name, which could substantially harm our business. In addition, our competitors could attempt to capitalize on our brand recognition by using domain names similar to ours. Domain names similar to ours have been registered in the United States and elsewhere, and in some countries the top-level domain name “trivago” is owned by other parties. We may be unable to prevent third parties from acquiring and using domain names that infringe on, are similar to, or otherwise decrease the value of, our brand or our trademarks or service marks. Protecting and enforcing our rights to our domain names and determining the rights of others may require litigation, which, whether or not successful, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention.
Claims by third parties that we infringe on their intellectual property rights could result in significant costs and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
From time to time, we could be subject to various patent and trademark infringement claims. These claims could allege, among other things, that our website technology infringes upon owned patented technology and/or trademarks of third parties. If we are not successful in defending ourselves against these claims, we may be required to pay monetary damages, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. In addition, the costs associated with the defense of these claims could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. As we grow our business and expand our operations, we expect that we will continue to be subject to intellectual property claims. Resolving intellectual property claims may require us to obtain licenses to use intellectual property rights belonging to third parties, which may be expensive to procure, or we may be required to cease using intellectual property of third parties altogether. Any of these events may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Confidentiality agreements with employees and others may not adequately prevent disclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary information.
A substantial amount of our processes and technologies is protected by trade secrecy laws. In order to protect these technologies and processes, we rely in part on confidentiality agreements with our employees, licensees, independent contractors and other advisors. These agreements may not effectively prevent disclosure of confidential information, including trade secrets, and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets and proprietary information, and in such cases we could not assert any trade secrecy rights against such parties. To the extent that our employees, contractors or other third parties with which we do business may use intellectual property owned by others in their work for us without our authorization, disputes may arise as to the rights in related or resulting know-how and inventions. Laws regarding trade secrecy rights in certain markets in which we operate may afford little or no protection to our trade secrets. The loss of trade secret protection could make it easier for third parties to compete with our services by copying functionality. In addition, any changes in, or unexpected interpretations of, the trade secret and other intellectual property laws in any country in which we operate may compromise our ability to enforce our trade secret and intellectual property rights. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Our use of “open source” software could adversely affect our ability to offer our services and subject us to possible litigation.
We use open source software in connection with our development. From time to time, companies that use open source software have faced claims challenging the use of open source software or compliance with

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